The jilting of granny weatherall analytical essay

Additionally, Porter uses simile and metaphor to describe the process of dying. [4] Early in the story, Porter uses images of floating to convey Granny's state of mind as she wavers in and out of consciousness. Granny's "bones felt loose, and floated around in her skin". "Doctor Harry floated like a balloon around the foot of the bed." "The pillow rose and floated under her." However, as Granny’s death becomes imminent, the tone changes, and Porter uses images of darkness and falling to describe Granny’s worsening condition. "Her heart sank down and down, there was no bottom to death." In describing the moment Granny dies, Porter writes, "She stretched herself with a deep breath and blew out the light."

Granny imagines getting into a cart beside a man she knows. Up ahead, she sees trees and hears birds “singing a Mass.” She holds her rosary while Father Connolly speaks Latin in a tone that strikes Granny as melodramatic. She imagines that he’s tickling her feet. She thinks again of George. She hears thunder and sees lightning. She thinks Hapsy has arrived, but it is Lydia. Jimmy is there too. Granny realizes that she’s dying. She feels surprised and unready. She thinks of small, last-minute advice and instructions she wants to give. Aloud, Granny tells Cornelia that she can’t go yet. Granny worries about what will happen if she can’t find Hapsy. She looks for a sign from God, but none comes. This absence is the worst sorrow of all, and she feels she has been jilted again. She dies.

The jilting of granny weatherall analytical essay

the jilting of granny weatherall analytical essay

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