Canada independent nation essay

The Rathnelly neighbourhood in Toronto made headlines in 1967, while celebrating Canada's 100th birthday. During the celebrations, Rathnelly residents playfully declared themselves as a republic independent of Canada. To mark their independence, the "Republic of Rathnelly" elected a queen, organized a parade, and issued Republic of Rathnelly passports to everyone in the neighbourhood. The new nation conscripted all 8- to 14-year-old citizens to form a militia, known as the Rathnelly Irregulars, and armed them with 1,000 helium balloons (the Rathnelly "air force"). The "Republic of Rathnelly" continues to hold annual street parties. [7]

French interest in the New World began with Francis I of France , who in 1524 sponsored Giovanni da Verrazzano to navigate the region between Florida and Newfoundland in hopes of finding a route to the Pacific Ocean. [44] Although the English had laid claims to it 1497 when John Cabot made landfall somewhere on the North American coast (likely either modern-day Newfoundland or Nova Scotia) and had claimed the land for England on behalf of King Henry VII, [45] these claims were not exercised and England did not make any attempts at permanent colonization. For the French however, Jacques Cartier planted a cross in the Gaspé Peninsula in 1534 and claimed the land in the name of Francis I establishing a region called Canada the following summer. [46] Permanent settlement attempts by Cartier at Charlesbourg-Royal in 1541, at Sable Island in 1598 by Marquis de La Roche-Mesgouez, and at Tadoussac, Quebec in 1600 by François Gravé Du Pont had all eventually failed. [47] Despite these initial failures, French fishing fleets sailed the Atlantic coast and into the St. Lawrence River , trading and making alliances with First Nations, [48] as well as establishing fishing settlements such as in Percé in 1603. [49] As a result of France's claim and activities in the colony of Canada, the name "Canada" was present on international maps denoting this colony within the St-Lawrence river region. [50]

Election ads have been making fun of the hair-styles of Trudeau and Harper – Trudeau’s floppy mop versus Harper’s white thatch – but when Margaret Atwood, the country’s most popular internationally-read novelist, wrote a gently mocking article for the right-wing ‘National Post’ about the prime minister’s hair, her short essay appeared – and then immediately disappeared – from the ‘Posts’s’ website.  “Of the three national male leaders, which one travels with a personal grooming assistant – lavishly paid for in whole or in part by you, gentle taxpayer?” she mischieviously asked.  “Hint:  Initials are .”  When the article was eventually re-posted, however, the rival ‘Globe and Mail’ spotted that several sentences had been censored by the ‘Post’, including a suggestion that Harper had been “coyly hiding the two-million dollar donors to his party leadership race.”  The reference to ‘donors’ was deleted.   

Canada independent nation essay

canada independent nation essay

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