America and americans essay

Slave trade was a profitable endeavor: the more slaves transported to the New World on a single ship, the more money the traders made. Africans, chained together in pairs, were crammed by the hundreds onto the ships' decks; lying side by side in endless rows, they had no room to move or exercise and barely enough air to breathe. Their one-way trip, commonly referred to as the Middle Passage, ended in the Americas and the islands of the Caribbean. But sources indicate that somewhere between 12 and 40 percent of the slaves shipped from Africa never completed the Middle Passage: many died of disease, committed suicide by jumping overboard, or suffered permanent injury wrestling against the grip of their shackles.

A large number of tribes migrated to the Western part of the country, mostly due to Andrew Jackson's Indian Removal Act of 1830. After years and years of struggle, American Indians are finally getting the much deserved respect that they should have received a long time ago. Museums have been erected all over the country showing tribute to this great people, and educating the public about their history and rich heritage. While the number of American Indians still living today is much fewer than it was centuries ago, their people still remain strong and proud of who they are and what they have become.

America and americans essay

america and americans essay

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